Macbeth by William Shakespeare

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"This castle hath a pleasant seat; the air /nimbly and sweetly recommends itself /unto our gentle senses."


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Objectives
To develop an understanding the key areas of the play, including:
  • Character development and characterisation
  • Context and setting
  • Important events and turning points
  • Important ideas and themes
  • Close reading
  • Shakespeare's use of language



Information icon.svg Macbeth
Description:
Macbeth unit
Subject:
Topic:
Type:
Sector:
Complexity:
Intermediate
Creator/Reviewer:
Date:
02/06/2011
License:
Contributors:
See: History
Tags/Keywords:
//wikieducator.org/Shakespeare/Macbeth
//wikieducator.org
wiki
en


This open education resource is designed to help high school students studying the play Macbeth by William Shakespeare. Macbeth is one of Shakespeare's shortest plays, but is one of his most engaging. The characters of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth loom large in the play. When we watch their unbridled ambition and their desire to achieve their goal regardless of consequence, we see a glimpse of the power humans possess to do great harm.

The main areas of study are:

This resource is designed to be interactive and you to contribute your ideas. If you can think of other good questions to ask, add them to the activities. If you see an error, feel free to correct it.



Wikipedia svg logo-en.svg  Macbeth
The Tragedy of Macbeth (commonly called Macbeth) is a play by William Shakespeare about a regicide and its aftermath. It is Shakespeare's shortest tragedy and is believed to have been written sometime between 1603 and 1607. The earliest account of a performance of what was likely Shakespeare's play is April 1611, when Simon Forman recorded seeing such a play at the Globe Theatre. It was first published in the Folio of 1623, possibly from a prompt book for a specific performance.

This extract is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license. It uses material from the article "Macbeth", retrieved 16 April 2008.