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These course outlines were made available by Mr. Paul Kobina Effrim

UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

COURSE OUTLINE

Course Code: EGS 422 Course Title: Theories of Vocational Development Course Lecturer(s): A. I. Taylor & D. K. Buku

Introduction:

People tend to haphazardly go through life without the benefit of guidance.  Sometimes people intuitively move in the direction that serves them best, but many people are unhappy with their jobs and other life roles. 

Course description: This course is designed to help students pursue career development process and specifically examine how individuals make career choices; the meaning of work in people’s lives, the major theories of career development, and some of the career information system available. In addition, multicultural issues related to career development, ethical, professional and legal issues in the realm of career development will be examined. Finally, implications for counselling of the theories will be discussed.

Objectives: At the end of this course students should be able to:

• Define and explain some basic concepts in career development. • Explain the basis for the classification of career choice and development. • Apply issues and trends in career development to the Ghanaian educational system and

       the issue of career-related information.

• List and explain theories of career development. • Point out some counselling implications of the theories.

Content:

The following topics will be discussed:

1. Brief historical perspective on vocational guidance 2. Definition and classification of basic concepts eg. Work, job, career development,

       career guidance, career counseling etc.

3. Contemporary issues and Trends in career Development 4. Factors influencing career choice 5. Sources of career information


An indepth study and application of the following theories:

6. Trait-and-factor theory 7. Psychoanalytic concept of career development 8. Anne Roe’s theory 9. John Holland’s Typology 10. Donald Super’s theory

Course Requirement/Assessment

CA: Attendance Assignments Seminars/Presentations 40% Class quizzes


END OF SEMESTER EXAMINATION 60% TOTAL 100%

Reading list

Brown, L. L. & Associates (1990) Career choice and development (2nd edition) San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Ipaye, T. (1990) Educational and vocational guidance: Concepts and approaches. Ibadan: Bezekos press.

Kottler, J. A. & Brown, R. W. (1996) Introduction to therapeutic counseling. (3rd edition) New York: Brooks/Cole pub.

Neukrug, E. (1999) The world of the counselor: An introduction to the counseling profession. New York: Brooks/Cole pub.

Taylor, A. I. & Buku, D. K. (2006) Basics in Guidance and counseling. (2nd edition) Accra: Salt “N” Light.

Weinarch, S. G. (1979) Career counseling: Theoretical and practical perspectives. New Yoirk: Mcgraw-Hill Book company.


UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

COURSE OUTLINE

Course Code: PGC 523 Course Title: Theories of Vocational Development & Counselling Course Lecturer(s): Mr. A. I. Taylor & Mr. Paul Ackom

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is designed to help students pursue career development process and specifically examine how individuals make career choices; the meaning of career in people’s lives, the major theories of career development, and some of the career information systems available.

In addition, multicultural issues related to career development, ethically, professional and legal issues in the ream of career development will be examined.

Objectives: At the end of this course students should be able to:

a) Define and explain some basic concepts in career development – career, career awareness, career development, career counselling, career guidance, career path, job, occupation, career conversion/conferencing etc. b) Explain the basis for the classification of theories of career choice and development. c) Apply issues and trends in career development to the Ghanaian educational system, the use of career related information, eg. Computer assisted career guidance. d) List and explain the theories of career development


COURSE OUTLINE

- Brief history on vocational guidance - Definition and classification of basic concepts eg. Career development work job, career, etc - Factors influencing career choice - Importance of Vocational Guidance in the contemporary Ghanaian situation - Sources of career information - An indepth study and the application of the following theories: - Trait and factor - Anne Roe’s Theory - John Holland’s Typology - Donald Super’s theory - Ginzber, Ginzberg and Associates theory - Contemporary issues and Trends in Career development


COURSE REQUIREMENT

- Class attendance is very important lateness to lectures is an academic offence - Prompt submission of assignment

MODE OF ASSESSMENT

Continuous assessment - 40% End of semester exams - 60% Total - 100%


References

Brown, L. L. & Associates (1990) Career choice and development (2nd edition) San Fianciseo: Jossey-Bass publishers.

Ed. Neukrug E. (1991). The world of the counselor: an introduction to the counselling profession U.S.A. Brooks/Cole publishing company.

Stephen G. Wernalrch (1979). Career counselling – theoretical and practical perspectives. New York, Mcgraw-Hill Book company.

Ipaye T. (1990). Guidance and Counselling practices. Nigeria, University of Ife press.

Ipaye T. (1986). Educational and Vocational Guidance – Concepts and Approaches-Ibadan, Bezekos press.

Taylor A. I. and Buku D. K. (2006) Basics in Guidance and Counselling 2nd Edition. Accra: Dansoman Salt ‘N’ Light.

Zunker V.G. (1994) Career Counselling: Applied concepts of Life Planning 4th Edition. California Brooks/Cole publishing Co. Pacific Grove.

George and Christiani (1986) Counselling: Theory and Practice 2nd Edition. New Jersey Prentice Hall Inc. Englewood Cliffs.


UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

COURSE OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE  : Guidance and Counselling in Education COURSE CODE  : EDC 351 SEMESTER II : 2007/2008 NO. OF CREDIT  : 2 ` COURSE LECTURER(S): Rev. Dr. A. Afful Broni, Mr. S.R. Ziggah, Mr. D.K Buku, Mr M.K Numale, Dr. Antwi Danso, Ms Christina Noi- Okwei & Ms Hannah Odoom

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The course deals with the principles and foundations of Guidance and Counselling. It also introduces students to practice and services rendered by the school in the educational vocational and personal guidance of students. It focuses on the tools and techniques of Guidance and Counselling and the role of the classroom teacher in providing services to pupils and parents in this era of rapid socio-economic change all over the place.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: The course is designed to help students develop an appreciation for Guidance and Counselling as an integral part of educational programmes.

By the end of the course students teachers should be able to: i. Define and explain the concepts Guidance and Counselling. ii. Draw a distinction between the terms Counselling and Guidance. iii. Identify the Guidance Services and explain their functions. iv. Give reasons to show the need to include Guidance and Counselling in school programmes.

COURSE CONTENT: The course will discuss the following topics:

i. Historical Development of Guidance ii. The Concept Guidance and Counselling defined iii. Differences between Counselling, Guidance, and Psychotherapy iv. Types of Counselling v. The guidance Services vi. Principles of guidance vii. Guidance Functionaries (a) The Headmaster (b) The Classteacher. © The Form Tutor/Headmaster (d) The School Psychiatrist, etc. viii. Importance of Guidance in Ghana’s Educational system.

Impediments in the Effective Functioning of Counsellors in Ghanaian schools


MODE OF ASSESSMENT

Continuous Assessment - 40% Final Examination - 60%

READING LIST


1. Berepiki, C.E. (1961). An approach to Guidance in Schools. Lagos Federal Ministry of Education.

2. Durojaiye, M.O.A. (1972). Psychological Guidance of the child. Ibadan.

3. Egan, G. (1975). The Skilled Helper. Montorey, Califonia.

4. Gibson R.L. & Mitchell (1981). Introduction to Guidance and Counselling 2nd Edition McMillan Pub. Company New York.

5. Kankam G., & Onivehu A. (2000). Principles and Practice of Guidance and Counselling Accra K. “N” A.B. Ltd. P.O. Box 16003.

6. Kottler, J.A., & R.W. (1985). Introduction to Therapeutic Counselling. Montorey, Califonia.

7. Krumboltz, J.B., & Thoresen C.E. (1969) Behavioural Counselling: Cases and Techniques. Holt, Renehart N. Y.

8. Numale, M. (2007). Guidance & Counselling in Education. Cape Coast: Yaci Publications

9. Shertzer & Stone (1980). Fundamentals of Counselling. 3rd Edition, Hughton Mifflin Company.

10. Taylor, A. I., & Buku, D..K. (2006). Basics in Guidance & Counselling. (2nd edition). Accra: Salt ‘N’ Light publication.


Checklist for submitting assignments

1. Name of student, Student ID 2. The paper was written using one inch margins and an appropriate font(preferably Times New Roman) is double spaced 3. The paper has been proof read for spelling and grammatical errors 4. All references have been cited and has been written in the APA format







DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA

COURSE OUTLINE: 2007/2008 SECOND SEMESTER

COURSE CODE: EDC 111

COURSE TITLE: THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM SOCIAL CHANGE AND NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

LECTURERS: REV. DR A. AFFUL-BRONI, MR. S. R. ZIGGAH, REV. SWANZY ESSIEN, MRS. A.E. ASEMANYI, MR. FELIX DUODU, REV. S. ACQUAH

The course introduces students to the theoretical basis of the School Curriculum. It examines the meaning, purposes and functions of education. It looks at the nature of social change and national development. The roles of liberal education and technical education in national development are also discussed.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

By the end of the course, students should be able to: 1. Explain the meaning, purposes and functions of education. 2. Discuss the concept of the school curriculum, curriculum formulation and implementation processes. 3. Identify the role of the school curriculum in social change and national development. 4. Discuss the importance of liberal and technical/vocational education in national development.

SECTION 1 The concept of Education

SECTION II Definition of curriculum Kinds of curriculum Views on curriculum Determinants of curriculum Patterns of curriculum organization The process of curriculum development The role of CRDD in curriculum development in Ghana

SECTION 111 The nature of social change The school curriculum is an agent as social, political and economic change.

SECTION IV The concepts Liberal and Technical/Vocational Education. Relationship between Liberal and Vocational Education/Technical Education. The importance of Vocational/Technical Education in National Development. A review of the Basic curriculum.


READING LIST

Afful-Broni, A. & Ziggah, R.S. (2006) Introduction to Curriculum Development in Ghana Accra: Yamens Press.

Aboagye, J.K. (1999). Some Issues in Curriculum Development, Accra: City Publishers.

Balogun et al., (1981) Principles and Practice of education (London: Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

Bishop G. (1985). Curriculum Development: A Texbook for students (London Macmillian Publishers Ltd).

Hama, J. (2003), The School Curriculum: A tool for educationa and national development, Accra: Step Publishers.

Kelly A. V. (1981) Curriculum: Theory and Practice.

Nacino-Brown et al (1982) Curriculum and Instruction, an Introduction to Methods of Teaching, London. Macmillan press.

Policy statement, Curriculum Enrichment Programme (1986) Ministry of Educatin, Accra.

Taba, H. (1962). Curriculum Development: Theory and practice: New York: Harcourt Brace.

Wheeler, D.K. (1967). Curriculum process: London, Hodder & Stougton


Relevant articles in the Dailies. There are other useful books in the Library that students can rely on.

MODE OF ASSESSMENT There will be continuous assessment and end of semester examination.

CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT Students will be expected to write two (2) assignments and quizzes. This will cover 40% of the total marks.

END OF SEMESTER EXAMINATION To qualify for a pass, candidates should score at least 50 percent in the continuous assessment and end of semester examination altogether.



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF EDUCATION OF WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

COURSE OUTLINE

COURSE CODE: EDC 111 SEMESTER 1 2001/2002

COURSE TITLE  : THE SCHOOL CURRICULUM SOCIAL CHANGE AND

                                NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

INSTRUCTORS: MRS. JUDITH HAMA, MR. PETER KWEGYIR AGGREY, MR. FELIX DUODU, MISS. ALICE EHUN

The course introduces students to the theoretical basis of the School Curriculum. It examines the nature of Social change and National development and the role of the school curriculum in bringing about changes. There is a discussion on the place of liberal and Vocational/Technical education in national development.

INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

Lessons will be presented through lecture discussion sessions as well as radio presentation. There will also be school visits following by group work.

The course will be presented in three parts: Section I

The concept of School Curriculum Education –Definition Form and type of Education The Concept of School Curriculum Kinds of Curricula Link between Education Culture and Curriculum. Determinants of Curriculum The Process of Curriculum Development. Processes of Curriculum Implementation

Section II

The nature of Social Change Education and an agent of Social change How the school Curriculum promotes change politically socially and economically. The role of CRDD in Curriculum Development.



SECTION III

Analysis of the Concepts Liberal’ and technical/Vocational Education.

Interrelationship between Liberal and Vocational Education/Technical Education. The importance of Vocational/Technical Education in National development. A review of the Basic curriculum.

READING LIST REFERENCES

Aboagye J.K. (1999)  : Some Issues in Curriculum Development, Accra City

     Publishers.

Aboagye J.K. (1998) Historical Foundations of Education in Ghana (Unpublished Manuscript)

Abosi C. O. & Brookman Amissah eds, (1992). Introduction to Education in Ghana (Accra: Sedco Publishing Ltd.)

   Balogun et al., (1981)  Principles and Practice of Education  (London:  Macmillan 		Publishers Ltd.
   Bishop G (1985)  Curriculum Development:  A Textbook for students (London:

Macmillan Publishers Ltd.

Blackmore et al. (1981) A Sociology of Education for Africa (London, George Allen & Unwin

Kelly A. V. (1981) Curriculum: Theory and Practice

Nacino-Brown et al Curriculum and Instruction, an Introduction to Methods of Teaching (London: Macmillan Press, 1982)

    Policy statement, Curriculum Enrichment Programme (1986)  Ministry of Education, 

Accra.

    Schofield (1972)  The Philosophy of education:  An Introduction, London:
	George Allen & Unwin Ltd.
    Taba H. (1962)  Curriculum Development:  theory and Practice, New York;

Harcourt Brace

     Wheeler D.K. (1967)  Curriculum Process, London, Hodder & Stougton
     Robert Owens:  Organisational Behaviour in Education:  Alyn & Bacon, New York.
     K. I. Adentwi.  Curriculum Development:  An Introduction.
     
     Relevant articles in the Dailies.

There are other useful books in the main Library that students can rely on.

MODE OF ASSESSMENT

There will be continuous assessment and end of semester examination.

CONTINUOUS ASSESSMENT

Students will be expected to write two (2) assignments and quizzes. This will cover 40 marks.

END OF SEMESTER EXAMINATION

Candidates will be expected to attempt there (3) questions out of five (5). The total marks Will be sixty (60).

To qualify for a pass, candidates should score at least 50 percent in the continuous assessment and end of semester examination altogether.











UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

COURSE OUTLINE

COURSE TITLE  : EDC 241 COURSE CODE  : PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT & LEARNING SEMESTER II : LECTURERS: Dr. Antwi-Danso, Mr. P.K.A. Amissah, Mr. S. O. Frimpong, Ms. Christina Noi-Okwei, Mr. Felix Duodu, Rev. F. Essien, Mr. P. Effirim, Rev. S. Acquah

COURSE DESCRIPTION This is a basic and introductory course in the study of the nature, stages and principles of Human Development and Learning. It discusses the basic concepts in child development and growth as well as the course of physical, mental, emotional and social development of individual. The teachers role in promoting a healthy development in children is highlighted.

The course also examines learning as a concept, its process and product and the effective ways by which pupils could be guided to learn effectively.

Finally some major learning theories are discussed and attempts made to a apply their principles for effective class instruction.

COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the course, the student will be expected to:

a) Describe growth b) Define development c) Differentiate between the various sages of human development

i) Prenatal ii) Infancy iii) Early childhood iv) Middle childhood v) Late childhood vi) Adolescence

(a) Identify threats of foetal development (b) Define Learning (c) Describe some issues involved in the definition of learning (d) Discuss some Learning theories (e) Apply some principles of Learning theories to teaching (f) Explain emotion and relate it to classroom teaching


COURSE CONTENT

i. Basic concepts in Human Development

(a) What is development? (b) What is growth? (c) What is maturation

ii. Principles of Growth and Development iii. The Course of Human Development


(a) Phases/stages of development (b) Factors affecting Prenatal Development (c) Physical Development

iv. Social and emotional Development

1. Emotional Development - Definition - Effects - Emotional behaviour in children

2. Social Development - Social expectations - Social deviations

v. Language Development in Childhood

(a) Stages of Language Development (b) Factors affecting Language Development

vi. Human Learning

(a) The concept of Learning - Definition - Issues involved in definition - Learning as a process - Learning as a product

(b) How Does Learning Take Place? - Theories of Learning - The behaviourists (Skinner and Thorndike) - The Cognitivists (Piaget) - Implication for classroom learning and teaching factors Affecting Learning

(c) Motivation and Learning (d) Transfer of Learning (e) Remembering and forgetting


REFERENCE

Amissah, P. A. K. and Sam-Tagoe, J. (2002). Psychology of Human Development and Learning, Accra, Akonta publication.

Blair, G. Jones, R. and Simpson R. (1990). Educational Psychology. London, Macmillan.

Davis, Roger and Houghton Peter (1991). Mastering Psychology. Macmillan.

Davidoff, I. I. (1986). Introduction top Psychology. Routhledge Kegan Paul.

Fontana David (1986). Psychology for teachers. 2nd Edition, Macmillan.

Houston, J. P. Bee Helem et al (1979). Invitation to Psychology Academic press Inc.

Helins, D. B. & Turner, J. (1986). Exploring Child Behaviour. 3rd Edition Brouce/Colepublishing Co.

Kelvin, L. & Rober J. H. (1987). Child and Adolescent Development. Houghton Mifflin Co.

Mussen P. H. Conger J. J. ey. Al. (1990). Child Development and Personality. edition Harper Collins.

Oladele J. O. (1989). Fundamentals of Psychological Foundations of Education, A Handbook for Education. Students and teachers. 3rd edition Johns – Lad Publishers Ltd.

Schickedanz J. A. and others (1998). Understanding children and Adolescent 3rd edition. Ally and Bacon.

Siann G. and Ugwuedbu D. (1980).Educational Psychology in a Changing. World, London. George Allen.






UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

SECOND SEMESTER OF 2007/2008

COURSE OUTLINE

COURSE CODE : EGS 421

COURSE TITLE : PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE

COURSE LECTURER: MR. P.A.K. AMISSAH & MR. S. OPPONG FRIMPONG COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is designed to throw light on the adolescence stage of human development. It will look at the explanation of Adolescence and why the period requires a special study.

Some theories of adolescence as well as the physical, social intellectual, etc. characteristics of adolescence will be treated. Furthermore, some aspects of heterosexual development will be discussed. COURSE OBJECTIVES By the close of the session students should be in a position to:

1. Define adolescence. 2. Say why it is necessary to study adolescence. 3. Discuss some of the theories of adolescence crises. 4. Compare and contrast the theories of adolescence 5. Compare the intellectual, physical social etc. characteristics of the adolescent. 6. Discuss some of the heterosexual activities of the adolescent. COURSE OUTLINE UNIT 1 – INTRODUCTION (i) Definition of adolescence (ii) Why adolescence requires a special study (iii) The needs of adolescence (iv) Developmental Tasks UNIT 2 – DEVELOPMENT PROCESSES OF ADOLESCENCE i. Physical ii. Social iii. Intellectual iv. Educational implications UNIT 3 - THEORIES OF ADOLESCENCE CRISES (i) Biologically induced crises (a) Hall’s recapitulation theory (b) Freud’s psychosexual theory (ii) Socially induced crises (a) Erikson’s psychosocial theory (b) Lewin’s field theory UNIT 3 - OTHER INTERPRETATIONS OF THE CRISES i. Margaret Mead’s view point ii. Vigotsky’s view point iii. Dragunova’s view point iv. Educational Implications UNIT 5 HETEROSEXUAL DEVELOPMENT AND ACTIVITIES i. Dating ii. Petting iii. Masturbation iv. Homosexuality v. Lesbianism vi. Social implication MODE OF ASSESSMENT 1. Quizzes - Continuous 2. Class Assignment (Take Home) - Assessment 3. Seminar (Groups) - 40% 4. End of Semester Exams - 60%

                                                        Total     =        100%

REFERENCES

1.       Davis, Roger, and Houghton Peter (1991)  Mastering Psychology.  Macmillan
 2.	Davidoff L.L. (1986) Introduction top Psychology.  Routledge Kegan Paul
 3.	Fontana David (1986) Psychology for Teachers 2nd edition. Macmillan.
 4.        Houston, J.P. Bee, Helen et al  (1979) Invitation to Psychology Academic  
            Press Inc.
5.       Helins, D. B & Turner, J. (1986) (Exploring Child Behaviour 3rd 
              Edition Brouce/Cole Publishing Co.

6.       Kelvin, L & Robert J. H (1987) Child and Adolescent Development    

Houghton Mifflin Co.

7. Mussen P. H. Conger J.J. and others (1990) child development and Personality 7th edition Harper Collins.

 8.      Oladele J. O. (1989)  Fundamentals of Psychological Foundations of 
          Education,  A Handbook  For education Students and Teachers. 
  3rd edition Johns –Lad Publishers Ltd.

9. Schickedanz J. A. and others (1998) Understanding children and Adolescents. 3rd edition. Ally and Bacon.



UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION & MEDIA STUDIES


COM 537: Administration & Management in Higher Education Institutions

LECTURER: Rev. Fr. Anthony Afful-Bromi, PhD affulbroni@hotmail.com 020-8115564

Introduction

This course aims at exposing students to fundamental principles of educational administration and management. Students will be introduced to basic theoretical and practical issues in educational administration with particular reference to higher institutions in Ghana. The course will assist students to appreciate the meanings and purposes of administration and management in higher institutions and the critical roles of the administrator. Students will also be familiarized with the unique nature and structure of higher institutions and the important roles they play in Ghana’s development process.

Course Content

• The nature and purpose of Educational Administration and Management in Ghana • Management and Administration of Higher Institutions in Ghana • The Processes of Administration • The functions of the Administrator • Principles of Administration and Management • Mission Statements • Leadership Styles • Leadership Effectiveness Theories • Motivation and Performance • The School and the Community

Reading List

Afful-Broni, A. (2004). Theory and Practice of Educational Leadership in Ghana. Accra: Type Press

Afful-Broni, A. (2005). Critical Issues for Educational Leadership in Ghana. Accra: Type Press.

Hoy, W. K. & Miskel, C. G. (2005). Educational Administration: Theory, Research & Practice. 7th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Sergiovanni, T. J. (1996). Leadership for the school house. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Sergiovanni, T. J., & Starratt, R. J. (1993). Supervision: A Redefinition. 5th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Starratt, R. J. (1996). Transforming Educational Administration: Meaning, Community, & Excellence. New York: McGraw-Hill.

UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

SECOND SEMESTER OF 2007/2008


COURSE OUTLINE


COURSE CODE : PGS 421

COURSE TITLE : School Related Problem

PLACE OF INSTRUCTION: G. and C. Lecture Room (1)

NAME OF INSTRUCTOR : Hannah E. Odoom

COURSE STRATEGY	:	Lecture/Discussion, Seminar, Project Work

MAIN GOAL/PURPOSE OF COURSE: This course is designed to help the student teacher identify and analyse learners’ problems in school. It also focuses on helping him/her develop techniques or strategies to curb such problems.

EXPECTATIONS

It is expected that by the end of the course the student will be able to:

1. Identify and discuss the components of a school and possible problems that can emanate from them. 2. Identify and discuss the physiological, psychological vocational and sociological characteristics of basic and second cycle school learners as sources of school related problems. 3. Identify categories and analyze the school related problems of the target group of learners. 4. Suggest appropriate techniques or strategies for eliminating or ameliorating those problems TOPICAL OUTLINE:

UNIT I: The school and its components and the challenges they pose. i. The physiological, psychological and sociological characteristics, of the basic school pupils i.e. Age, temperament ability and behaviour and their likely school related problems.. ii. Characteristics of the secondary school students (adolescent) i.e. behavior, social class, ability, attitude and their likely school related problems.

UNIT II: School related problems of the basic and second cycle schools learner i.e. Learning problems, social problems, psychological problems, mal-adaptive problems and problems with administrative procedures.

UNIT III: Techniques or strategies for curbing school related problems.


COURSE ACTIVITY The student is expected to identify one learner from any school of his/her choice in Winneba with any of the school related problems and help the learner solve his/her problem.

REQUIREMENT

The student is required to present at least one assignment work, one class quiz, one project work, an end of semester examination.

ASSESSMENT

4TH WEEK - CLASS WORK 8TH WEEK - PROJECT WORK 10TH WEEK - CLASS QUIZ 15TH AND 16TH - END OF SEMESTER EXAMINATIONS

READING LIST

1. Durojaiye, M.O.A. (ED 1972); Psychological Guidance of the School child; Ibadan, evans Brothers Ltd.

2. Mankinde, Olu (1983) Fundamentals of Guidance and Counselling, London, MacMillian.

3. Okoye, N. Adejumo, D. Achebe, C; (1990) Fundamentals of Guidance and Counselling. Ibadan, Heirman Educational Books (Nigeria) Ltd.

4. Peku, N. K. (1992) Introduction to Guidance for Training Colleges. Accra, University Press.

5. Shertzer & Stone, (1980) Fundamentals of Guidance, Boston, Houghton, Mufflin and Co.

6. Steinberg, L; & Belsky, J., (1991), Infancy, childhood, & Adolescence: Development in Context, New York, McGraw-Hill, Inc.

7. Sprinthall, N. A., & Sprinthall, R.C., (1990) Educational Psychology: Developmental Apprach. 5th Ed. New York McGraw-Hill, Inc.

8. Agyeman, D. K., (1986) Sociology of Education.



SUMMARY AND EVALUATION OF PROJECT WORK


1. What specific school related problem did you work at?


2. What were your objectives?


3. Which questions guided you to achieve your objectives?


4. What techniques did you use to collect your data?


5. In solving the identified problem what intervention/approaches did you employ?


6. What challenges did you face in your attempts at helping your client to overcome his/her challenge(s)


7. How did you overcome the challenge(s)?


8. What level of success did you achieve? (partial?, total? Etc) v


SECTION ‘B’ ASSESSMENT

TASK I: BACKGROUND AND PROBLEM ASSESSMENT - (25 Marks)

ACTIVITY I: BACKGROUND TO PROBLEM - (10 Marks) ACTIVITY II: PROBLEM ASSESSMENT - (15 Marks)

TASK II: PROCESS / PROCEDURE - (35 Marks)

ACTIVITY I: PROCESS - (10 Marks) ACTIVITY II: INTERVENTION AND SOLUTION- (25 Marks)



UNIVERSITY OF EDUCATION, WINNEBA DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION

COURSE OUTLINE

COURSE CODE : PGS 442

COURSE TITLE : EDUCATIONAL SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

SEMESTER : 2

YEAR : 2007/2008

CREDIT : 2

COURSE LECTURER : P.A.K. AMISSAH, MR. S. O. FRIMPONG, MS. CHRISTINA NOI-OKWEI COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is an initial exposure of students to the field of Social Psychology as related to the practice of education. It guides students to understand the relationship that should exist between teachers and students as a result of the knowledge of the basic processes affecting social and person perception. The course touches on leadership in relation to the teacher’s role as well as the wielding of authority and power in the classroom. It also exposes students to group dynamics as well as norms and conformity in the school setting. Exposure of students to attitude, attitude formation and attitude change is also part of this course.

COURSE OBJECTIVES By the end of the semester students should be able to:

(i) Define social Psychology (ii) Establish a link between Social Psychology and Education. (iii) Trace the historical emergency of leadership (iv) Explain ‘authority’ and ‘power’. (v) Identify and describe the type of power that a teacher can develop and wield. (vi) Explain ‘group dynamics’ and interpersonal attraction in the school setting (vii) Discuss norms and how they develop and why people deviate from societal norms (viii) Describe various reasons for which individuals do conform to norms

(a) Define attitudes (b) State the characteristics of attitudes (c) Describe how attitudes contribute to behaviour change OUTLINE

UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION

- Nature and scope of Social Psychology - Methods of investigating Social Psychological phenomenon - Social Psychology and education

             II	LEADERSHIP IN THE EDUCATIONAL SETTING

- Nature and definition of Leadership. - Emergence of Leadership. - Theories of Leadership.

III AUTHORITY AND POWER IN THE CLASSROOM.

- Nature and definition of authority - What is Power? - Types of Power available to the teacher - Use of power and authority over students

IV GROUP DYNAMICS - Interpersonal attraction and class group behaviour. - Sociometry and class interaction - Group influence on the motivation and performance of the individual.

V NORMS AND CONFORMITY

- What is norms? - What is conformity? - Effect of school/classroom norms on achievement - Why people conform - Factors affecting non-conformity

IV ATTITUDES

- Definition and characteristics of attitudes - Theories of attitude organization - Attitudinal and Behavioural change MODES OF DELIVERY

1. Lecture………………. 2. Discussion of emergent issues 3. Seminars (groups) 4. Individual presentations

MODES OF ASSESSMENTS MARKS A 1. Written Assignment 10 2. Class Quizzes 10 3. Seminars (Group) 10 4. Individual Presentations 10

                                                           			40%

B 5 End of Semester Examinations 60%

Totals A + B = 100%


REFERENCES

Amissah P. A. K. & S. Oppong Frimpong (2008). Educational Social Psychology.

Bany, M. A. and John , L. V. (1976)Educational social Psychology Macmilan Publishing Co. Inc.

Charters, W. W. and Gage, N. L (eds) Reading in the Social Psychology of Education. Allyn and Bacon Inc.

Guskin, A. E. and Guskin, S.L. (1970) A Social Psychology of Education Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.

Houston, J. P. H, et al (1979) Invitation to Psychology Academic Press.

Johnson, D. W. (1970) The social Psychology of Education Rinehart and Winston Inc.

Davidoff, Linda L. (1986) Introduction to Psychology (7th edition) Routledge.

Fleming, C. M. (1959) The social Psychology of Education, Routledge and Kegan Paul.

Secord, P. F. and Backman, C.W. (1964) Social Psychology MacGraw Hill Inc.

Myers, David G. (1983) Social Psychology, New York, MacGraw Hill Book Company.

Baron, R. A. Byrne, D. and Kantowitz, B. H. (1980) Psychology: Understanding Behaviour, New York, Holt, Rinehart and Winton.

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