Talk:Copyright for Educators/History

From WikiEducator
Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

Thread titleRepliesLast modified
«no subject»007:14, 25 January 2012
Closing Reflection915:54, 26 December 2011

«no subject»

Authors have the right since they create, no one can have the authority to give them what is implicit in their product. The need of recognition arises when you try to make bussines with creation, in any sense. Social recognition would be another reason to pretend to give the "right" to an intellectual product. In suh a sense, it is under the laws of history and makes a different sense. In music, having the correct information of an author, allow musicians to make a proper performance of an specific type of music, and also to make variations of it.

Heriberwik (talk)07:14, 25 January 2012

Closing Reflection

RE: "Copyright law was expressly introduced to limit the rights of the controllers and distributors of knowledge. Yet, these controllers are successfully turning a “copy” right into a property right. The traditional rights of learning institutions are being taken away. The balance for researchers should be restored. Research and learning must be allowed the broad interpretation that was intended in the original laws."

Should we be asking (discussion) questions here rather than telling educators what to think?

Fortunately, in a digital world, Creative Commons provides the legal tools for education institutions to restore the balance by granting permissions and freedom to create new knowledge without restriction."

CC licenses still have restrictions, so this statement is somewhat misleading.
Jane Park (talk)16:10, 21 January 2011

I agree with Jane's points. Just thought I'd post to re-open this thread.

Thoughts on this?

Alison

ASnieckus (talk)23:05, 9 December 2011

Thanks Alison,

In a course which is designed to accommodate hundreds of participants - -running discussion forums is not practical. Its near impossible for a single facilitator to realistically moderate a discussion of +500 participants. Also, from prior experience, when running a forum folk complain about the volume of email.

Perhaps we can insert a micro-blog reflection on what folk think and feel.

Jane is correct in pointing our that CC is still copyright. Perhaps we should qualify the statement along the following lines:

Fortunately, in a digital world, Creative Commons provides the legal tools for education institutions to restore some of the balance by granting permissions and freedom to create new knowledge with fewer restrictions."
Mackiwg (talk)23:41, 9 December 2011

RE: "Fortunately, in a digital world, Creative Commons provides..."

Wayne, I think your wording revision takes care of the issue. I've revised as you suggested.

RE: "Copyright law was expressly introduced to limit the rights of the controllers and distributors of knowledge. Yet, these controllers are successfully turning a “copy” right into a property right. The traditional rights of learning institutions are being taken away. The balance for researchers should be restored. Research and learning must be allowed the broad interpretation that was intended in the original laws."

I do think a micro-blog reflection would be better than telling people prescriptively what to think about this. I checked and there are only 2 other micro-blog reflections in "Copyright for Educators" so adding one more doesn't seem like overload.
What about moving the paragraph in question to a direct quote by Rory McGreal (from my reading, he is the author), conclude with the bit about Creative Commons and then ask people what they think about copy right using the micro-blog reflection standard--I've put in some questions, please help improve them:
Template
Share with us your thoughts about the development of copyright. (Post your contribution on image:Identica_Icon.png identi.ca and include the hash tag "#OCL4Ed" in your post, for example: "In my opinion .... #OCL4Ed."):
  • Do you believe the right of an author to "own" his/her creative work is a property right?
  • Should the rights of authors to "own" their creative works supercede that of research and learning, especially in light of the internet's broad use as an educational tool?
  • another question here?

Thoughts?

ASnieckus (talk)22:33, 11 December 2011

Hi Alison,

Agreed on all your suggestions. I would like to see a Micro-blog reflection added here.

Yes Rory was the author and there is also a published article reference here:

http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/205/287

Go for it!

Mackiwg (talk)23:42, 11 December 2011

I revised the section to include the quoted conclusion with a micro-blog reflection following, to encourage discussion of individual opinions. I think that takes care of this issue, although always open for further improvements.

Alison

ASnieckus (talk)02:33, 14 December 2011