Stream by boardwalk at Ethan Allen Homestead

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Streams logo web.jpg Stream by boardwalk at Ethan Allen Homestead
Basin:Winooski
State or Province:Vermont
Country:USA
Latitude:44.507215
Longitude:-73.230138
School:Hunt Middle School


This page is based on samples taken by the hard-working scientists from grades 7 and 8 at Hunt Middle School. All samples were from the stream running through the wetland by the boardwalk at the Ethan Allen Homestead.

....Hunt students: Some are listed in red because we have never collected it with previous schools. Nice job finding some new things. We'll photograph your specimens when time permits and add them to the growing data base.

The students from Hunt found corixids in this stream because the stream drains through a wetland by the bike path.


Lymnaeidae

Lymnaeidae.jpg
Family
Lymnaeidae


Members of the family Lymnaeidae belong in the class of Gastropoda. Members contain a single, coiled shell with a right-handed spiral. Differing from those of Planorbidae, members of Lymnaeidae have a larger opening. Respiration in these snails are through lung-like structures. Preferred habitats include those with slow streaming waters and heavy vegetation.

Images of the family Lymnaeidae and the class Gastropoda.




Pisidiidae

Sphaerium corneum.jpg
Order
Veneroida
Family
Pisidiidae


Fingernail clams are the most common small clams that we find in Vermont rivers. Larger bivalves should not be sampled because they may belong to a protected species. Under no circumstances should clams be moved from one river site to another.




Ceratopogonidae

Ceratopogonidae.jpg
Order
Diptera
Family
Ceratopogonidae


Common name
biting midges
Members of this family look like very straight Chironomidae. They are very long and thin with a distinct head capsule and no prolegs. Some in the lab call them 'bamboo sticks' with eyes.

Image of the distinct head capsule.




Pleidae

Pleidae.jpg
Order
Hemiptera
Family
Pleidae


This family of Hemiptera has a small, convex body and a 'beak' with 3-4 segments.

Click to see the 'beak'.




Tipulidae

Tipula cover.jpg
Order
Diptera
Family
Tipulidae


Common name
The Crane Fly
Tied fly
Gangle Legs
Like other larvae from the order Diptera, members of the family Tipulidae (crane flies) lack legs. Tipulidae have retracted, difficult-to-see head capsules at one end, and a spiracular disk at the other end. The spiracular disk can sometimes look like a face leading to some confusion about which end is which. Upon gently cutting the head open, one can see that the mandibles are not parallel to each other, but rather move against each other.

The genera we've encountered include Antocha, Dicranota, Hexatoma, Limnophila, Molophilus, Pedecia and Tipula.





Dytiscus

Dytiscus.jpg
Order
Coleoptera
Family
Dytiscidae
Genus
Dytiscus


Adult Dytiscidae have streamlined bodies and hind-legs modified for swimming. They are characterized by the division of the first abdominal segment by the hind coxae. Don't let the paired claws and prominent 'tails' of Dytiscus larva tempt you to think 'stonefly'; these tails are far less segmented than Plecoptera tails.The head and jaws are also unlike those of stoneflies.

Images of the hind-legs, first abdominal segment, 'tails', Plecoptera tails, and the head and jaws.



Coenagrionidae

Coenagrionid.jpg
Order
Odonata
Family
Coenagrionidae


Common name
narrowwinged damselflies
Tied fly
Polly's Green Damsel
These damselfly larvae (sub-order Zygoptera) can be distinguished from dragonfly larvae (sub-order Anisoptera) by their more slender bodies and the presence of three leaf-like gills at the end of the abdomen and The family Coenagrionidae is characterized by its distinctly shaped labium which may or may not be extended.

Images of the gills at the end of abdomen, and another here. An image of the labium, and an extended labium.




Template:Dixidae

Dixella larvae horisontal.jpg
Order
Diptera
Family
Dixidae


Larvae from this occasionally-collected family have oval-shaped lobes attached to their rear end.




Peltodytes

Haliplidaeadults.jpg
Order
Coleoptera
Family
Haliplidae
Genus
Peltodytes


Both larvae and adults of this family of beetle can be found in ponds. The abdomen of the larvae end in 1-2 long filaments, and long filaments are also found protruding for elsewhere on its body. The adults are characterized by their hind coxae which are greatly expanded and cover the first couple abdominal segments.

Image of the hind coxae.



Template:Corixidae

Hesperocorixa.castanea.-.lindsey.jpg
Order
Hemiptera
Family
Corixidae


The common name for corixids in the United States is "Water boatman"; this same common name is used for a different insect in the British Isles illustrating the value of formal scientific names. Hardened wings that cross over each other is a trait that these insects share with other hemipterans. Lack of a boat-like keel separates corixids from back swimmers. These insects are common in ponds and sometimes collected in streams that drain pond and wetland habitats.




Scirtidae

Scirtidae larvae habitus.jpg
Family
Scirtidae
Genus
Scirtidae


As their common name suggests, marsh beetles are found among vegetation in aquatic habitats. They have a distinctive shape and the photograph should help with identification.




Pyralidae

Pyralidae individuals.jpg
Order
Lepidoptera
Family
Pyralidae


Larvae in this lepidopteran family do not necessarily have body filaments though this one does. It has welts on the bottom of its abdomen, and three pairs of stubby- but still segmented- legs on the thorax.