Sport Informatics and Analytics/Audiences and Messages

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Overview

Theme 4 of this course looks at how we share the insights we gain from sport informatics and analytics processes. It invites you to reflect on the why? what? how? and when? of sharing messages with different types of audience.

This theme:

In addition to this introduction, this theme contains these topics:

Augmented information

Karl Newell and his colleagues' (1985)[1], in the introduction to their discussion of augmented information and skill acquisition in physical activity, observe:

Skilled performance in any physical activity is usually the reflection of many hours of practice by the performer in that action. Practice does not merely involve repeated engagements in an activity but often interactions between the performer and an advisor... The central thrust of these interactions ... is the conveyance of information.[2]

They add "the conveyance to the performer of any information not naturally available within the task constraints can usefully be construed as augmented".[3]

Your role as a sports analyst involves you in decisions about the provision of augmented information to coaches, athletes and other support staff. These decisions offer you opportunities to reflect on how you communicate.

Harold Lasswell[4] suggested that a "convenient way to describe an act of communication is to answer the following questions":

  • Who
  • Says what
  • In which channel
  • To whom
  • With what effect?[5]

He adds "In gauging the efficiency of communication in any given context, it is necessary to take into account the values at stake, and the identity of the group whose position is being examined".[6]

In sport contexts, this may involve you in considerations about the feedback or the feedforward you provide. This includes, as Richard Schmidt[7] argued, the frequency of the augmented information you share.

We hope that this course will encourage you to reflect on the mindfulness you will develop as you extend your experiences of observing, analysing and sharing accounts of performance in sport.

Sharing Insights

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Making connections

We think you might find a post by Martin Bucheit (2017)[8] of interest as you reflect on sharing your insights with coaches and athletes. Martin notes "the academic culture and its publishing requirements have created a bit of an Apollo 13-like orbiting world (e.g., journals and conferences) that is mostly disconnected from the reality of elite performance". We hope his discussion of informed practice helps you appreciate "context over simple scientific conclusions"[9].



Video signpost

In this video, Carrie Graf, former coach of the University of Canberra Capitals, and a University of Canberra Coach in Residence in 2015, discusses how she shares information with the teams she coaches.


Resources

ePortfolio questions

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Questions about this theme

As you work your way through this theme and compile your ePortfolio, you might like to consider these six questions.

Q19. Is ‘augmented information’ a helpful description of the ways you share information?

Q20. Does ‘feedforward’ have any place in your work?

Q21. Do you have any experience of using infographics?

Q22. Are there any visualisation approaches that you recommend?

Q23. Is the concept of a personal learning environment helpful in your practice?

Q24. Can you visualise your personal learning environment?



References

  1. Newell, K; Moris, L; Scully, D (1985). "Augmented information and the acquisition of skill in physical activity". Exercise and sport sciences reviews 13(1) (1): 235-262.
  2. Newell, K; Moris, L; Scully, D (1985). "Augmented information and the acquisition of skill in physical activity". Exercise and sport sciences reviews 13(1) (1): 235.
  3. Newell, K; Moris, L; Scully, D (1985). "Augmented information and the acquisition of skill in physical activity". Exercise and sport sciences reviews 13(1) (1): 235.
  4. Lasswell, Harold (1948). "The structure and function of communication in society". The communication of ideas 37 (1): 215-228.
  5. Lasswell, Harold (1948). "The structure and function of communication in society". The communication of ideas 37 (1): 216.
  6. Lasswell, Harold (1948). "The structure and function of communication in society". The communication of ideas 37 (1): 228.
  7. Schmidt, Richard (1991). "Frequent augmented feedback can degrade learning: Evidence and interpretations". Tutorials in motor neuroscience: 59-75.
  8. Bucheit, Martin. "Housto, will still have a problem". https://martin-buchheit.net/2017/07/03/houston-we-still-have-a-problem/. Retrieved 17 November 2017.
  9. Bucheit, Martin. "Housto, will still have a problem". https://martin-buchheit.net/2017/07/03/houston-we-still-have-a-problem/. Retrieved 17 November 2017.