King Lear by William Shakespeare

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Objectives
To develop an understanding the key areas of the play, including:
  • Character development and characterisation
  • Context and setting
  • Important ideas and themes
  • Shakespeare's use of language





Information icon.svg King Lear
Description:
King Lear unit
Subject:
Topic:
Type:
Sector:
Complexity:
Intermediate
Creator/Reviewer:
Date:
02/03/2012
License:
Contributors:
See: History
Tags/Keywords:
//wikieducator.org/Shakespeare/King_Lear
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wiki
en

Audiobook of the complete play



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Audio

Listen to Librivox recordings of the play:


Cartoon version of the play

Shakespearean glossary

Do you know your 'dost' from your 'wherefore'? There is a glossary of words commonly used in Shakespearean plays [here]. Make sure you know these words, as they'll help you to understand the play a lot better.

Context

Plot

Summary


Review

  • Pull together across the whole text
  • eg:

Act I Quiz


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Activity

Find quotations that show the following:




Quotations

Why are each of these quotations important in the play? Think about what they reveal about character, their importance in terms of theme, imagery, relationships etc. Make a comment about each one.

Quotation Importance:
 ?
Animal Imagery

Why is each of these animal allusions used?

Quotation Importance:
"that she may feel/How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
To have a thankless child." (Lear, I, iv, 294-96) [p. 70]
 ?
"When she shall hear this of thee, with her nails
She'll flay thy wolvish visage." (Lear, I, iv, 314-315) [p. 71]
 ?
"Such smiling rogues as these,
Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwain
Which are too intrince t'unloose; smooth every passion
That in the natures of their lords rebel,
Being oil to fire, snow to the colder moods;
Renege, affirm, and turn their halcyon beaks
With every gale and vary of their masters,
Knowing naught, like dogs, but following." (Kent, II, ii, 75-82) [p. 84]
 ?
"O Regan, she hath tied
Sharp-toothed unkindness, like a vulture, here." (Lear, II, iv, 133-34) [p. 95]
 ?
"She hath abated me of half my train,
Looked black upon me, struck me with her tongue,
Most serpentlike, upon the very heart." (Lear, II.iv.158-160) [p. 96]
 ?
"Because I would not see thy cruel nails
Pluck out his poor old eyes; nor thy fierce sister
In his anointed flesh rash boarish fangs." (Gloucester, III.vii.57-59) [p. 128]
 ?
"I' th' last night's storm I such a fellow saw,
Which made me think a man a worm." (Gloucester, IV, i, 32-33) [p. 132]
 ?
"Tigers, not daughters, what have you performed?" (Albany, IV.ii.40) [p. 137]  ?
"They flattered me like a dog, and told me I had white hairs in my beard ere the black ones were there." (Lear, IV, vi, 97-99) [p. 150]  ?
"Edmund, I arrest thee
On capital treason; and in thy attaint
This gilded serpent." (Albany, V, iii, 83-85) [p. 171]
 ?



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Reflection

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